The Golden Cockerel

All That’s Gold Does Not Glitter

Behind Rimsky-Korsakov’s The Golden Cockerel’s exotic melodies, political satire masquerades in Pushkin’s fairy tale—as a dim-witted head of state, Tsar Dodon, leads his country into a disastrous war on the advice of equally stupid counselors. “The music is truly magical…comic and deeply moving,” says stage director Paul Curran (La Donna del Lago, 2013). Conducted by Emmanuel Villaume (La Fanciulla del West, 2016), it features bass-baritone Eric Owens (Wozzeck, 2011) and contralto Meredith Arwady (The Impresario and Le Rossignol, 2014), along with tenor Barry Banks (Ermione, 2000). Acclaimed Russian soprano, Venera Gimadieva makes her Santa Fe debut as the Queen of Shemakha.


Performed at The Crosby Theatre


Season

2017

Music by

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

Text by

Vladimir Nikolayevich Bel'sky

Sung in

Russian

Instant Translation Screen

English
Spanish


For more information or group sales:

800-280-4654
We hear Rimsky-Korsakov’s musical affinities — foreign color, brilliant orchestration, scintillating harmonies, virtuosic writing — expressed with a melodic freedom.

Artists

Eric Owens
Eric Owens

King Dodon

Meredith Arwady
Meredith Arwady

Amelfa

Gary Mccann
Gary Mccann

Scenic & Costume Design

Venera Gimadieva
Venera Gimadieva

Queen of Shemakha

Kevin Burdette
Kevin Burdette

Commander Polkan

Barry Banks
Barry Banks

Astrologer

Paul Curran
Paul Curran

Director

Emmanuel Villaume
Emmanuel Villaume

Conductor

Enhance Your Experience

Dining

Dining

Enjoy our Preview Dinners, Pre-ordered Picnics, and Tailgating with gorgeous views.

Learn More

Transportation

Transportation

Book a comfortable round-trip ride from Santa Fe or Albuquerque.

Learn More

Tours

Tours

Go behind the scenes with our Backstage and "Opera Ranch" Tours.

Learn More

Lectures

Lectures

Discover more about each production through our complimentary prelude talks.

Learn More

The Music

All That Glitters…

In the shadow of a presidential election, is fantasy any stranger than political reality? A similar question might well have prompted Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov to create his dazzling 1908 opera The Golden Cockerel, which combines elements of fairy tale and political satire. He had enjoyed a critical and popular triumph in 1907 with his opera The Invisible City of Kitezh, and expected it to be his last. But like many of his compatriots, he was angered by politics in Russia, where the disastrous Russo-Japanese war (1904 – 1905) — a conflict that seemed very distant from most citizens’ concerns — had made their privations even worse.